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Lamb Race to Celebrate 19th Annual Fibrefest

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Mark the weekend of September 13 and 14, 2014 on your calendars because you won’t want to miss the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum’s 19th annual Fibrefest. The two-day festival of textiles and fibre arts will close this year with a Lamb Race. At 4 p.m. on September 14th, hundreds of wooden lambs will be thrown over the main falls in downtown Almonte, and the owners of the first three lambs to reach the finish line will win fabulous prizes. Tickets for the race will be on sale at the Museum and at Fibrefest.

At three locations—the Museum, the Almonte Arena, and the Almonte Curling Club—visitors will find demonstrations, vendors, and exhibits—a full two-day festival of fibre arts! Local guilds will demonstrate spinning, knitting, weaving, rug hooking, lacemaking, smocking and quilting. Vendors include spinners, weavers, and fibre artists from across the province, as well as quilt shops and alpaca farms. “That’s My Style,” vintage clothing show and sale will have a large number of vintage clothing dealers, giving patrons the opportunity to enjoy and purchase a huge variety of vintage fashions in one location.

The Friends of the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum will again be providing tea room services, featuring homemade goodies, beverages and sandwiches all available at a reasonable price.

Two featured Artists: Frances Taylor & Reiko Sudo

Frances Taylor of Ottawa works in a diverse range of media and frequently incorporates recycled materials. She often hand-dyes her materials (e.g., silks, mohair and other fibres) and uses semi-precious stones, hand and machine embroidery, fabric paints and recycled copper wire to achieve exciting textures and colours. Her goal is to make art that stimulates the senses and communicates caring for the environment.

At the Museum: Reiko Sudo + NUNO

Reiko Sudo is one of the founding members of the NUNO Corporation, an innovative textile company based in Tokyo, Japan. Sudo’s textiles are known for their combination of traditional techniques and experimental effects. Her work has revolutionized textiles for interiors, fashion, and art and has been shown around the world, including exhibitions at MoMA, New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and the Victoria & Albert Museum in the U.K.

This exhibition celebrates Sudo’s 30-year association with NUNO while providing a prototype for Canadian textiles artists and designers. Twenty textiles designed by Sudo and her associates at NUNO are featured, and using the unique architectural elements of the Museum Sudo has created a forest of fabric trees. The installation also provides an area where visitors and artisans can closely examine fabrics and learn more about the material, techniques and concepts used to create them.

The Museum’s second floor features the permanent history exhibit “Fabric of a Small Town,” which interprets how a piece of wool becomes a piece of finished cloth and includes industrial machines used throughout the process.

Whether you are interested in art, history, clothing, or textiles or are just looking for a great day out and about, Fibrefest will have something for you.

Admission to Fibrefest is $5.00 per day, which includes access to all sites.

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